News

EBR Decision
Dr. Tom Puk, a Professor from Lakehead University in Thunder Bay was the person who made the application which resulted in the land-mark 2005 decision to have the Ministry of Education subject to the Environmental Bill of Rights (EBR). This decision is important because it requires the Minister of Education to establish and make public a Statement of Environmental Values (SEV). In addition it means that the public can voice any concerns they have about the SEV via a public forum on the internet. Until this time the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Finance were two of the major Ministries that were not accountable to the EBR (there are still eleven Ministries not subject to the EBR). Acts, regulations or instruments that Ministries put forward that might affect environment must be posted on the Registry before these laws are legislated. Like most of the other Ministries, under the current ruling the Ministry of Education is still not subject to the review process. Unfortunately the Ontario Government has never followed-up on their commitment and the decision to prescribe the Ministry of Education to the EBR has never been acted upon. We would ask that people write in and demand that the Ministry of Education be subject to Notice and Comment and Review ASAP. Even better, citizens should contact their MPP's, the Premier, Minister of Environment, and Minister of Education now. For additional information on how the EBR can impact Ecological Education please contact us at inquiries@ecologicaleducation.ca.



The following Earth News items provided by:

EcoEarth.Info - The Environmental Sustainability Portal

08/21/2016
Forest restoration can turn the clock back
Climate News Network: The ecological and carbon cost of rainforest destruction goes on accumulating for years after nations halt the conversion of canopy into farmland, scientists have found. This implies that to meet ambitious targets, global strategies to combat climate change – including forest restoration – should have started years ago. Tropical forests soak up vast quantities of carbon dioxide released by industrial combustion of fossil fuels, limiting global warming. Burning, clear-felling and ploughing of...

08/19/2016
Scientists Find 1,075-Year-Old Tree in Northern Greece, Europe’s Oldest
Yale Environment 360: Scientists have discovered the oldest known living tree in Europe, dating it at more than 1,075 years old. The Bosnian pine (Pinus heldreichii) — a densely branched, slow-growing tree — was found in northern Greece, high in the Pindus Mountains. A team of Swedish, German, and U.S. scientists extracted a core of the tree’s one-meter thick trunk, and counted the rings that mark its annual growth—a dating technique known as dendrochronology. They found the tree started its life in 941. "I am impressed,...

08/18/2016
California's Blue Cut fire: climate change dismissed as 'excuse' on the ground
Guardian: James Webb huddled on the hill with his dog and watched the fire advance, the flames licking through the cherry trees, the oak trees, the peach trees, then swaying just short of his home, the last home left in this part of the valley. “We’ve been praying all day long, hoping for the best. I believe it’s working because our house is still standing even though everything around it has been burnt,” said the 20-year-old student. “It’s almost like a miracle.” It was sunset on Tuesday, just 32 hours...

08/13/2016
Obama previews new efforts to tackle climate change
DBS: His term may be winding down, but President Obama is determined to continue hammering away at the effects of climate change. In a new video address, the president previewed his latest efforts to address what he called "one of the most urgent challenges of our time," noting that despite national -- and international -- movement on climate change, "there's still so much more to do." "We're not done yet. In the weeks and months ahead, we'll release a second round of fuel efficiency standards for heavy-duty...

08/13/2016
‘Let’s get some perspective': Researchers say species face bigger threats than climate change
Washington Pot: Tackling climate change is the challenge of the century. But when it comes to endangered wildlife, scientists are arguing that we’ve got more pressing matters to worry about. A new comment just out today in the journal Nature contends that practices like hunting, fishing and agriculture are still the biggest threats to biodiversity on Earth -- and we need to be careful not to let our concern about climate change overshadow our efforts to address them. To be clear, the comment merely reflects the...

08/13/2016
A new dam is threatening one of the Middle East's most biodiverse regions
Mashable: At the bottom of a lush valley between rocky peaks of Mount Lebanon, strawberry farmer John Abu Akar may be the last man standing in the path of a dam project worth hundreds of millions of dollars. But he has a few tricks up his sleeve. When a minister's motorcade of tinted-window SUVs rolled through his village in 2012 to announce the multinational project, Abu Akar sabotaged the signs directing visitors to the location of a press conference so they pointed instead down the gravel path leading...

08/13/2016
Greenland sharks live for hundreds of years
ScienceDaily: While the more than 5 meter long Greenland shark is one of the world's largest sharks, it is also one of the least understood animals on our planet. The Greenland shark's general biology and way of life have been a mystery to biologists for many years. However, marine biologists at the University of Copenhagen have now deployed an epoch-making method to unveil one of the greatest of the mysteries surrounding this enigmatic shark -- and have come to an amazing revelation: with a life expectancy of...

08/13/2016
Large human brain evolved as a result of 'sizing each other up'
ScienceDaily: Humans have evolved a disproportionately large brain as a result of sizing each other up in large cooperative social groups, researchers have proposed. A team led by computer scientists at Cardiff University suggest that the challenge of judging a person's relative standing and deciding whether or not to cooperate with them has promoted the rapid expansion of human brain size over the last 2 million years. In a study published in Scientific Reports, the team, which also includes leading evolutionary...

08/13/2016
How did primate brains get so big?
ScienceDaily: Virtual brains reconstructed from ancient, kiwi-sized primate skulls could help resolve one of the most intriguing evolutionary mysteries: how modern primates developed large brains. University of Florida paleontologists found clues in the remarkably preserved skulls of adapiforms, lemur-like primates that scurried around the tropical forests of Wyoming about 50 million years ago. Thought to be a link between primitive and advanced primates, their fossil skulls were the best evidence available...

08/13/2016
Wildlife-friendly farming shown to benefit UK moths
ScienceDaily: Wildlife-friendly farming schemes can help boost the abundance of many UK moth species, a new study by the University of Liverpool has found. Large moths (macro-moths) play an important role as pollinators, but numbers have fallen in the UK by 28% since 1968. The situation is particularly bad in southern Britain, where numbers are down by 40%, with habitat loss thought to be behind the decline. The kinds of moths that benefited the most from the schemes were those commonly found on grassland,...

08/13/2016
Zika Virus: U.S. Surgeon general visits Miami clinic near Zika outbreak
Miami Herald: U.S. Surgeon General -- and dad-to-be -- Vivek Murthy paid a visit to his hometown Friday to drop by a medical clinic and reassure pregnant women as the number of local Miami Zika cases rose for a fourth straight day. Murthy, who graduated from Palmetto Senior High and whose wife is expecting a baby in September, met with about a half dozen women at the Borinquen Medical Center in the Wynwood area, which has been the epicenter for the virus in Miami. Just hours after his visit, state health officials...

08/13/2016
EPA won't investigate scientist accused of underestimating methane leaks
InsideClimate: A former Environmental Protection Agency adviser will not be investigated for scientific fraud, the EPA's Inspector General recently decided. The office was responding to environmental advocates who had charged that David Allen's work had underreported methane emissions from the oil and gas industry. The North Carolina advocacy group NC Warn had filed a 65-page petition with the Inspector General calling for an investigation into a pair of recent, high-profile studies on greenhouse gas emissions...

08/13/2016
This is no ordinary heat wave in the eastern U.S., as humidity reaches extreme levels
Mashable: From New Orleans to Portland, Maine, the heat and humidity has hit oppressive levels for the second long stretch this summer. In New York City, for example, entire blocks smell like hot garbage, and the air feels like a wet blanket, with heat indices approaching 110 degrees Fahrenheit. While the actual air temperatures during this heat wave are not record-breaking in most areas, it is the humidity that stands out as the weather event's defining feature. The dew point, which is the temperature...

08/13/2016
Chemists nearly unanimous in rejecting 'chemtrails' conspiracy theory
Mashable: In a first of its kind effort, a large group of top atmospheric chemists has weighed in on one of the most persistent conspiracy theories on the internet: that the U.S. government is involved in a campaign to deliberately spray chemicals from planes at high altitudes. This "chemtrails" conspiracy theory is bunk, the experts conclude in a new study published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters. Chemtrails is a conspiracy theory that pops up frequently in Reddit comment threads,...

08/13/2016
As helipad construction stokes tensions, a new wave of demonstrations flares up in Okinawa’s remote northern forests.
Civil Beat: When word got out that the construction of helipads used by the U.S. Marines for jungle aviation training was to begin anew, hundreds of protesters gathered in the dead of night along Route 70 last month, a narrow, winding mountain road, with plans to block the construction. Before sunrise around 500 riot police began ejecting protesters who see the helipads as a direct threat to peace and safety in the remote Yanbaru Forest. Anti-U.S. base protests are common in Okinawa (an estimated 65,000 demonstrators...

08/12/2016
Adaptation to Climate Change: Need for a Human Rights Approach
Inter Press Service: The memories of Cyclone Sidr and Aila are fresh in the mind of Razia Begum, a victim of climate change, of Dacope Upazila, Khulna. The standing field crops and houses of her community were destroyed, and they suffered the loss of cattle as well as people who perished in these natural disasters. She says mournfully that Saturkhali, Kamarkhola, Koilashganj and Baniashanta are the most vulnerable unions where access to necessary human rights is disrupted. Furthermore, salinity, flood, river erosion,...

08/12/2016
California lawmaker to float zero emission vehicle bill
Reuters: A California lawmaker next week will introduce a bill requiring 15 percent of all vehicles sold in the state to be emissions-free by 2025, her spokeswoman said on Friday. Assemblywoman Autumn Burke says the legislation is needed to ensure that California's current zero emissions vehicle target is met with actual vehicles and not just clean car credits, which environmentalists claim have flooded the market. "Governor (Jerry) Brown has set an ambitious goal of 1.5 million electric vehicles by...

08/12/2016
Trump: Climate change won't be 'devastating'
Hill: Republican presidential nominee Donald TrumpDonald TrumpReport: Advisers see Trump as 'sullen, 'erratic,' 'beyond coaching' Sunday shows preview: Trump's tough week Fusion to host town hall with Libertarian ticket MORE said Thursday “there could be some impact” from a changing climate, “but I don’t believe it’s a devastating impact.” In an interview with The Miami Herald, Trump reiterated he’s “not a big believer in manmade climate change,” and while he acknowledged problems such as rising sea...

08/11/2016
Food insecurity follows floods in Sri Lanka
SciDevNet: Food shortages brought on by extreme weather events have resulted in almost a quarter of Sri Lanka's 21 million people becoming malnourished, says a World Food Programme (WFP) document. "The increased frequency of natural disasters such as drought and flash floods further compounds food and nutrition insecurity,' says the document, the latest WFP country brief for Sri Lanka, released in June. As per WFP's most recent Cost of Diet Analysis, almost 6.8 million (33 per cent) Sri Lankans cannot...

08/11/2016
Solar and wind 'cheaper than new nuclear' by the time Hinkley is built
Guardian: The government expects solar and wind power to be cheaper than new nuclear power by the time Hinkley Point C is completed, its own projections show. Theresa May’s government last month made a surprise decision to delay a deal on Hinkley, prompting a renewed look at what alternatives could power Britain if ministers this autumn fail to back new reactors in Somerset. An unpublished report by the energy department shows that it expects onshore wind power and large-scale solar to cost around £50-75...

08/11/2016
There’s a new toxin in your water to worry about, America
Grist: To add to the "what might kill me in my home today?" files: According to a new report from Harvard researchers, 33 states have high levels of industrial pollutants polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl (PFASs) in their municipal water supplies. There are loads of chemicals in our water, but PFASs are pretty rough. They`ve been linked with cancer, hormone disruption, high cholesterol, and obesity. High levels of the toxins were found in the water supplies of at least 6 million people, according to...

08/11/2016
Balkan wildlife faces extinction threat from border fence to control migrants
Guardian: The death toll of animals killed by a razor wire fence designed to stop migrants crossing into Europe is mounting, amid warnings that bears, lynx and wolves could become locally extinct if the barrier is completed and consolidated. The rising tally of dead roe and red deer is still mercifully small, but contested by local people who claim that it is being systematically under-counted. Slovenia began erecting the barrier across 180km of its river border with Croatia last winter, as a temporary...

08/11/2016
Guns, tractors 'threaten wildlife more than climate'
Agence France-Presse: The main driver of wildlife extinction is not climate change but humanity's rapacious harvesting of species for food and trophies, along with our ever-expanding agricultural footprint, said researchers pleading for a reset of conservation priorities. In an analysis of nearly 9,000 "threatened" or "near-threatened" species, the scientists found that three-quarters are being over-exploited for commerce, recreation or subsistence. Demand for meat and body parts, for example, have driven the Western...

08/11/2016
Tens of thousands of birds being sold illegally in Javan bird markets
Mongabay: Indonesia is a hub for wild bird trade. In Jakarta, for example, previous investigations have revealed tens of thousands of birds being sold illegally in the city’s street markets. Now, a new report by TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network, shows that eastern and central Java, too, are hotspots for illegal wild bird trade. During a short three-day survey of five markets in Surabaya, Yogyakarta and Malang in eastern and central Java, TRAFFIC researchers found nearly 23,000 birds of 241...

08/11/2016
Scotland completely powered by wind turbines for a day
Guardian: High winds on Sunday were strong enough to power the equivalent of all of Scotland’s electricity needs for the day, according to environmentalists. The Met Office issued a yellow “be aware” weather warning covering much of the country as wind speeds reached 115mph on the top of the Cairngorms and gusts of more than 60mph hit towns in the north. The weather brought travel disruption, with some bridges closed, ferries cancelled and trains affected but helped boost the country’s renewable energy...

08/11/2016
Overshadowed by climate change
Deutsche-Welle: Climate change is a ubiquitous threat to species around world. But research by Australian scientists shows that some older, familiar enemies of biodiversity shouldn't be forgotten. Images of climate change are always arresting: Sometimes they come in the form of melting masses of ice, sometimes as torrential rivers or enduring droughts. The impact is always massive and visually striking and it lasts, regardless of the actual effects global warming is having. Because of that, climate change is...

08/11/2016
Philippines suspends two more mines in environmental clampdown
Reuters: The Philippine government has suspended operations at two more mines due to environmental violations in an ongoing audit of the country's mining sector, officials said on Thursday. The move raises the number of suspended mines to 10 - eight of them nickel ore producers - since the Southeast Asian nation launched a review of all mines on July 8. The closures and the threat of more mines getting hit in the world's top nickel ore supplier lifted prices of the metal to a one-year high of $11,030...

08/11/2016
How climate change is increasing forest fires around the world
Deutsche-Welle: Have wildfires increased globally over recent years? And if so, is global warming to blame? Research has illuminated this, along with what wildfires do to us and our environment, and which areas are most vulnerable. Are wildfires increasing around the world? Unusually large wildfires ravaged Alaska and Indonesia last year. This year, Canada, California and Spain have been devastated by uncontrolled flames, with Portugal and France as the newest victims of severe blazes. So, have wildfires...

08/11/2016
Climate Risk Is Poorly Represented in Company Financial Filings
ClimateWire: Corporate America has a split personality when it comes to climate change. When issuing marketing materials and press releases, U.S. companies frequently warn that rising global temperatures could cost them money. They tout specific green projects, like solar roofs and increased efficiency. But when it comes time to report to the Securities and Exchange Commission, the same companies stick to broad terminology and sanded-down statements. Take Target Corp., which outlined some of its efforts to...

08/11/2016
Scientists warn anthrax just one threat as Russian permafrost melts
Agence France-Presse: A recent anthrax outbreak in the far north of Russia left a child dead, 23 people infected and the government scrambling to deploy hundreds of rescue workers and soldiers to stop any further spread. The source, scientists say, seems likely to have been the long-buried corpses of reindeers on Yamal peninsula uncovered as Russia's permafrost melts -- and then been passed on to grazing herds. The fear now is that this is not a freak incident and that other diseases -- some dating back to the Ice...

08/11/2016
In California's climate debate, state lawmakers push for more authority
LA Times: With negotiations over extending California`s landmark climate change programs struggling during the last month of the state`s legislative session, lawmakers are once again pushing for changes at the agency responsible for making the greenhouse gas reductions work. The target is the California Air Resources Board, which regulates pollution under the climate change program and determines how billions of dollars generated by that effort gets spent. Over the last two weeks, a bipartisan group...

08/11/2016
The death of the world's most famous wolf pack is a troubling sign of our fragile ecosystem
Business Insider: The wolf pack that taught scientists how wolf packs work may be dead, scientists worry. Last they knew, the East Fork pack in Alaska's Denali National Park was down to a male, a female, and two pups. But as we first saw reported by The Guardian, a park ecologist told the media that the male was found dead and there's no sign of the rest of the pack at their den. The last male was killed by hunters. He was the latest in a troubling yearlong trend of about 75% of East Fork wolf deaths being due...

08/11/2016
Scotland just produced enough wind energy to power it for an entire day
Independent: For the first time on record, wind turbines have generated more electricity than was used in the whole of Scotland on a single day. An analysis by conservation group WWF Scotland found unseasonably stormy weather saw turbines create about 106 per cent of the total amount of electricity used by every home and business in the country on 7 August. Gale-force winds lashed much of the country with a speed of 115mph recorded at the top of Cairngorm mountain. A 17,000-tonne oil rig broke away from...

08/10/2016
Polar bears’ biggest threat is ice loss
Earth Sky: Prior to the 1970s, hunting decimated polar bear populations across the Arctic. The international community has made strides in protecting the iconic species from over-harvesting through conservation agreements, which have helped the species start to recover. However, a review paper published in Polar Research in July, 2016 suggests that the road to recovery is far from over, as ice loss now replaces poaching as the most pressing threat to polar bear survival in the Barents Sea area, north of Norway...

08/10/2016
High risk of modern slavery in nearly 60 percent of countries, global index finds
Reuters: Almost 60 percent of countries are at high risk of using slave labor in their supply chains, according to a new global index launched on Thursday, which also ranked North Korea as having the worst record of slave labor in the world. By assessing incidents of human trafficking or slavery, national laws, and the quality of law enforcement across 198 countries, risk analytics company Verisk Maplecroft found that 115 countries were at high or extreme risk of using slaves. "Few countries in the...

08/10/2016
An epic Middle East heat wave could be global warming’s hellish curtain-raiser
Washington Post: Record-shattering temperatures this summer have scorched countries from Morocco to Saudi Arabia and beyond, as climate experts warn that the severe weather could be a harbinger of worse to come. In coming decades, U. N. officials and climate scientists predict that the region’s mushrooming populations will face extreme water scarcity, temperatures almost too hot for human survival and other consequences of global warming. If that happens, more conflicts and refugee crises far greater than those...

08/10/2016
Australia: NSW koala habitat lost as land clearing continues: 'It would take the army to police these blokes'
Age: For the past five years, Alaine Anderson has watched with horror as great swathes of koala-friendly woodlands in their region of northern NSW have been smashed by bulldozers and then torched in bonfires. "We don't have much time to tell the truth," the 63-year-old farmer and grandmother said during a recent visit to her property at Croppa Creek. The extent of wide-scale land clearing across NSW is revealed in the new documentary, Cultivating Murder. Time is indeed short, with the latest figures...

08/10/2016
Rising avocado prices fuelling illegal deforestation in Mexico
Guardian: The popularity of the avocado in the US and rising prices for the “superfood” are fuelling deforestation in central Mexico. Mexican farmers can make much higher profits growing avocados than from most other crops and so are thinning out pine forests to plant young avocado trees. Once the avocado trees grow, they cut back the forest even more to give them more sunlight. Mario Tapia Vargas, a researcher at Mexico’s National Institute for Forestry, Farming and Fisheries Research, told the Associated...

08/10/2016
Here’s how life looks on Louisiana’s forgotten coastline
Grist: The coast of southeast Louisiana is disappearing faster than anywhere else in the world - scientists estimate a football field of land is lost to rising sea levels every hour. With the earth literally shifting beneath their feet, communities have to adapt. Many families are stalwartly digging in, elevating their properties to precarious heights, though perhaps no more precarious than the conditions they’re responding to. Other residents appear to be living life as usual, enjoying the degree of...

08/10/2016
Climate scientists make a bold prediction about sea level rise
Guardian: One of the great things about science is that it allows you to make predictions. Three top climate scientists just made a very bold prediction regarding sea level rise; we should know in a few years if they are correct. As humans emit greenhouse gases, it’s causing the Earth to warm. That’s indisputable and proven. We can actually measure the amount of extra heat. Since most of it ends up in the oceans, we can also measure other changes in the oceans. For instance, the oceans are rising. We...

08/10/2016
Wildfires kill three people on Portugal's Madeira, 1,000 evacuated
Reuters: At least three people died and more than a thousand were evacuated on the Portuguese island of Madeira when forest fires, raging for a third day, spread to the regional capital and tourist destination, Funchal, authorities said on Wednesday. Set off in a summer heatwave and fanned by strong winds, the fires have destroyed about 40 homes and a five-star hotel in the hills above Funchal. On mainland Portugal, thousands of firefighters were still struggling to control hundreds of forest fires...

08/10/2016
Volcanic eruptions can 'mask the true effects of climate change'
Wired: Recent reports that suggest sea levels aren't rising as fast as expected – and may even be dropping – could be inaccurate, according to new research. Experts from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have discovered that the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines could have masked the true reading, and this could have dire consequences for the future. Satellite observations, which began in 1993, show that the rate of sea level rise has held fairly steady at about 3 millimeters...

08/10/2016
Alaska has record warmth this year
KCCI: Alaska averaging 33.9 degrees over seven months may not seem warm to folks in the Lower 48. But that just proves they haven't lived there. A not-far-above-freezing high from January 1 to July 31 is a virtual heat wave. This year's average is 8.1 degree above the 20th century average of 25.8. 2016 has been on pace to be the hottest year on record. Ann Harmeling Class, a retired teacher in Wasilla, said fellow retirees agree the state is having much warmer winters and summers. "My lifelong...

08/10/2016
Shipping noise impairs ability of humpback whales to forage, study shows
Guardian: Increased shipping noise is disrupting the foraging behaviour of humpback whales in the North Atlantic, according to a new study. Scientists in the US and UK said their findings could impact upon the numbers of humpback whales in the long term. Many whales are found in coastal areas with high levels of shipping traffic, which often results in frequent fatalities from collisions. The team collected data from 10 whales within the Stellwagen Bank national marine sanctuary, which is a popular...

08/10/2016
Indochinese leopard has disappeared from 94% of its historical range
Mongabay: The Indochinese leopard is struggling to survive. Once widespread across southeast Asia, the leopard subspecies has been wiped out from much of its habitat, and now occurs only in six percent of its historical range, a new study published in Biological Conservation has found. “Nobody was expecting this,” co-author Jan F. Kamler, Southeast Asia Leopard Program Coordinator for Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization, told Mongabay. “All had assumed that the leopard was still quite...

08/10/2016
United Kingdom: Rising seal numbers in Thames estuary hide triple threat to populations
Guardian: Scores of seals loll on the riverbank of the Stour, snorting and bellyflopping as they sun themselves a couple of miles outside Ramsgate’s busy marina. Far from exceptional, these are just a smattering of the hundreds of seals that the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) hopes to count this week in the Greater Thames estuary. The mammals are sighted as far up as Teddington Lock, and Canary Wharf is a hotspot for seeing them. A total of 905 common and grey seals were found along the estuary last...

08/10/2016
In Uganda, Solar Power Plant Amid African Bush Inspires Hope
Voice of America: In this electricity-starved rural part of Uganda, men ride bicycles several kilometers to the nearest market town simply to charge their phones. That should change with the construction nearby of one of the largest solar plants in sub-Saharan Africa, where two-thirds of the population is without electricity and countries increasingly explore alternative sources of power. Frustrated by the slow pace of rural electrification in this East African country of 36 million people, many Ugandans have...

08/10/2016
China backs GMO soybeans in push for high-tech agriculture
Reuters: China will push for the commercialization of genetically modified soybeans over the next five years as it seeks to raise the efficiency of its agriculture sector, potentially boosting output of the crop by the world's top soy importer and consumer. China, which has spent billions of dollars researching GMO crops, has already embraced the technology for cotton but has not yet permitted the cultivation of any biotech food crops amid fears from some consumers over perceived health risks. In its...

08/10/2016
Meet the California Couple Who Uses More Water Than Every Home in Los Angeles Combined
Mother Jones: Rafaela Tijerina first met la señora at a school in the town of Lost Hills, deep in the farm country of California's Central Valley. They were both there for a school board meeting, and the superintendent had failed to show up. Tijerina, a 74-year-old former cotton picker and veteran school board member, apologized for the superintendent--he must have had another important meeting--and for the fact that her own voice was faint; she had cancer. "Oh no, you talk great," the woman replied with a warm...

08/09/2016
Leonardo DiCaprio's Oscar speech spiked climate change searches and discussions on social media, study finds
Independent: When Leonardo DiCaprio won an Academy Award in February this year, after many years of near-misses, the internet reacted with delight. Following years of memes about DiCaprio’s perceived lack of good fortune when it came to Oscar gongs, new joyous memes were created and shared and social media exploded with heartfelt praise. While this internet reaction might have been expected following a win by the popular actor, another effect was also felt on the internet. When the Revenant actor delivered...

08/09/2016
Hollywood Is Finally Taking on Climate Change. It Should Go Even Further
Slate: Hollywood celebrities have long prided themselves as the social conscience of America. Now, it seems, they've widened their reach to the entire Earth. "Climate change is real, it is happening right now,' DiCaprio said in his Oscar acceptance speech in February. "Let us not take this planet for granted.' With those words, DiCaprio did more for climate change advocacy than any other individual effort, ever, according to a new study. Compared to the Paris climate summit last December--in which...

08/09/2016
Leonardo DiCaprio's 'The Turning Point' set for Toronto film festival
Canadian Press: Star-studded thrillers and horrors, and the world premiere of Leonardo DiCaprio's documentary "The Turning Point" are bound for the Toronto International Film Festival. On Tuesday, organizers unveiled this year's lineup of docs and shorts, as well as dark, twisted and boundary-pushing films for the edgy Midnight Madness program. Among the highlights is DiCaprio's climate change doc, which he made with actor-filmmaker Fisher Stevens, who won an Oscar for producing "The Cove." Meanwhile, Adam...

08/09/2016
Right-Wing Group Continues to Diligently Stalk Environmental Leaders
EcoWatch: Last May, we introduced you to CoreNews.org, a fake news page dedicated mainly to tailing Hillary Clinton, Tom Steyer and Bill McKibben. It's the product of a GOP opposition research PAC America Rising, one so dedicated to blatantly false political attacks that even Fox News has had to fact check it. In the months since, they've been diligently stalking their targets and breaking big news like the time they caught McKibben as he committed the mortal sin of using plastic bags. This sort of unimportant...

08/09/2016
Sites targeted for deep-sea mining teeming with new species
Mongabay: An area targeted for deep sea mining is teeming with diverse life forms, including several new species, a new study has found. Countries have been eyeing the deep seafloor of the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ) — a massive 6 million square kilometers (~2.3 million square miles) area in the Pacific Ocean — for its “polymetallic nodules”, ball-like clumps rich in metals like cobalt, copper, manganese and nickel. But life forms lurking in the dark, deep seafloor of this zone remain largely unknown. ...

08/09/2016
Belarus under fire for 'dangerous errors' at nuclear plant
Guardian: Thirty years after world’s worst nuclear accident at Chernobyl, Belarus, which saw a quarter of its territory contaminated in the disaster, is building its first energy plant powered by the atom. However a series of mishaps at the site in Astravets are raising concerns over safety, particularly in Lithuania whose capital, Vilnius, lies less than 31 miles (50km) from the site. In July it was reported by local news that a nuclear reactor shell had been dropped while being moved. Local resident...

08/09/2016
Greenpeace sounds alarm over China's long-distance fishing fleet
Guardian: China’s vast, long-distance fishing industry has expanded to more than 10 times the size of America’s and its growth is depleting fisheries and creating conflicts, according to a Greenpeace report. From 2012 to 2014, the number of Chinese vessels involved in “distant water fishing” [DFW] – harvesting seafood on the high seas or in other countries’ waters – grew from 1,830 to 2,460. The Chinese government is directly driving this growth by subsidising fuel costs and other expenses, according...

08/09/2016
Nobody can buy the silence of a climate spinning out of control
Caroline Lucas: The government’s reckless pursuit of fracking has reached new lows with the announcement that ministers will attempt to buy off widespread community opposition to the controversial new fossil fuel source through the introduction of a £1bn Shale Wealth Fund. At a time when we need to be making the transition to a jobs-rich zero-carbon future, this would be a gross violation of the commitments made in Paris last year. Already 2016 is set to be the hottest year on record and without a global step-change...

08/09/2016
Indian Jails Slammed as Purgatory for the Poor
Inter Press Service: A media frenzy ensued in New Delhi last month when a popular television channel highlighted the horrific living conditions of women inmates in ward number six of Tihar Jail, South Asia`s largest prison. The program - "Fear and Loathing in Tihar" - beamed into people`s homes the prisoners` abysmal treatment by the administration: 600 of them packed like sardines into space meant for half that number, a lack of basic amenities, and a shocking state apathy towards detainees in the world`s largest...

08/09/2016
China to spend $65 billion to improve water supplies: ministry
Reuters: China plans to spend a total of 430 billion yuan ($65 billion) on around 4,800 separate projects aimed at improving the quality of its water supplies, the environment ministry said late on Monday. The Ministry of Environmental Protection said in a notice on its website (www.mep.gov.cn) that the central government had already allocated funds of 13 billion yuan for 2016, which will be used mainly to improve urban drinking water and prevent pollution in China's major rivers. The notice did not...

08/09/2016
Emerging diseases threaten Maasai and their herds
SciDevNet: For the semi-nomadic Maasai pastoralists of Ngorongoro district in northern Tanzania, herding underpins lives, livelihoods and cultural identity. Cattle, goats and sheep provide food and income, so families move around to reach the food and water their animals need to survive. As a result, life is shaped by shifts in vegetation, weather and water levels. But this unique culture is endangered by climate change and emerging diseases, as well as by broader socio-political threats —access to land and...

08/09/2016
Earth Overshoot Day keeps moving up: What's the pace of change?
Christian Science Monitor: According to the Global Footprint Network, we as a planet have already used up Earth's resources for the year. In the 50 years of keeping record of Earth Overshoot Day, this is the earliest the day has occurred. It used to happen regularly in September, and last year it fell on August 13. View Caption About video ads View Caption of Earth Overshoot Day, also known as Ecological Debt Day, marks the date each year when we’ve used up as many natural resources as Earth can regenerate in a single year....

08/09/2016
Climate changes affecting Maldives coral reefs getting bleached due to warmer sea temperature
India Live: After the Great Barrier reef, Maldives is the new victim of climate change. About 60% of the once-pristine coral reefs of the Maldives have been bleached and in some area this figures reaches to 90%. The study was conducted by the Maldives Marine Research Centre and the Environmental Protection Agency, in collaboration with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The Indian Ocean archipelago is known for its colorful coral gardens but The Ocean Agency says that a strong El...

08/09/2016
Even Before The Paris Agreement Takes Effect, Hundreds Of Corporates Are Voluntarily Offsetting Emissions
Ecosystem Marketplace: In 2007, as airlines around the world were lobbying to prevent the regulation of greenhouse-gas emissions from passenger flights, Delta Airlines started looking for ways to reduce its emissions – first by increasing fuel efficiency, and eventually by investing $1 million in a massive effort by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to buy up old farms across the Lower Mississippi Valley and restore them to their natural, forested state so that trees can absorb enough carbon dioxide (CO2) to offset some of...

08/09/2016
Earth Overshoot Day: Living beyond our means
Deutsche Welle: We've used up more resources than the planet can regenerate in a whole year - and it's only the start of August. Mathis Wackernagel of the Global Footprint Network explains why we need to check our overconsumption. Back in 1987, the date when we overshot the planet's annual natural budget fell on December 19. Since then we have depleted resources ever faster. In 2016, Earth Overshoot Day falls on August 8. DW talks to Mathis Wackernagel, cofounder of the Global Footprint Network. Deutsche...

08/09/2016
US Court Rules in Favor of Chevron in Ecuador Pollution Case
Telesur TV: A U.S. federal appeals court ruled Monday in favor of the oil giant Chevron in a case that dates back more than 20 years, blocking one of Ecuador's Indigenous community from collecting a judgement of nearly US$8.6 billion for environmental damage to the Amazon rain forest. The decision from the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan dismissed claims by the lawyer Steven Donziger on behalf of Ecuador's Lago Agrio region, that is most impacted by the dirty legacy of Chevron's Amazon drilling....

08/09/2016
Pollution crackdown on China tin producers could spur imports, lift prices
Reuters: China could ramp up imports of refined tin as a string of environmental inspections at smelters in the world's top producer of the metal curbs local output. Officials in eight provinces last month began inspecting metals producers including tin smelters, forcing some to shutter production while they look to comply with environmental standards, according to industry officials and analysts. The checks come as a crackdown on pollution spreads beyond steel in the country's mammoth metals processing...

08/09/2016
Study: DiCaprio’s Oscar Speech Did More For Climate Change Than Earth Day
Dispatch: Actor Leonardo DiCaprio’s Oscar acceptance speech comments urging action on climate change drew more attention on social media than Earth Day, according to a study out of the University of California San Diego. The study, titled “Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change,” was published Aug. 2 in scientific journal Plos One. It argues DiCaprio’s acceptance speech for best actor received much more attention on social media than it did on traditional...

08/08/2016
Coloradans Narrowly Defeat ‘Don’t Sign’ Campaign, Will Get To Vote On Fracking
ThinkProgress: Two measures that would limit oil and gas development in Colorado just cleared a massive, highly contested hurdle toward getting on the ballot in November. A group of environmental and community organizations submitted the requisite 196,984 signatures?—?and then some?—?to the Colorado Secretary of State on Monday, sources said. The signatures would allow initiatives 75, which would authorize towns and cities to regulate fracking, and 78, which would create mandatory setbacks for oil and gas development,...

08/08/2016
Looking Different Than Your Parents Can Be an Evolutionary Advantage
UCR Today: Looking different to your parents can provide species with a way to escape evolutionary dead ends, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the University of California, Riverside. The work, which is outlined in a paper published today (August 8) in the journal Nature Plants, looked at polyploid hybrids in the genus Nicotiana, the group that includes tobacco. Unlike humans, which are diploids – with two copies of each of their 23 chromosomes (one from each parent)...

08/08/2016
Decline of fishing in Lake Tanganyika 'due to warming'
BBC: New research blames rising temperatures over the last century as the key cause of decline in one of the world's most important fisheries. Lake Tanganyika is Africa's oldest lake and its fish are a critical part of the diet of neighbouring countries. But catches have declined markedly in recent decades as commercial fleets have expanded. However this new study says that climate warming and not overfishing is the real cause of the problem. Diversity hotspot Estimated to be the world's...

08/08/2016
‘Alarming’ coral reef bleaching wave descends on the Maldives
Grist: We have a new competitor for the “worst place on Earth to be a coral!” More than half of the coral reefs in the Maldives have been hit by a wave of bleaching this year, according to a new survey conducted by a team of researchers. Signs of bleaching were found in around 60 percent of the study area’s total number of corals — in some segments of the reef, the percentage of corals affected was as high as 90 percent. The biodiversity-rich area is home to some 3 percent of the planet’s corals. The...

08/08/2016
Endangered California condors eating contaminated carrion
United Press International: California condors are making a comeback. But now conservationists worry the endangered species' diet is putting the birds are risk. Marine mammals are an abundant food source, but they're also a repository for contaminants accumulating in the ocean. New research shows coastal condors in Central California have higher levels of pesticides and other toxins than their peers living farther inland. Condors are equal opportunity consumers, feeding on animal carcasses of all kinds. On the coast,...

08/08/2016
California wildfire forces closure of scenic Highway 1
Reuters: An epic wildfire that has killed one person and blackened about 60,000 acres along the California coast, forced authorities on Monday to shut down a portion of scenic Highway 1 near Carmel-by-the-Sea. The closure of the highway, which runs along much of the Pacific coastline and is famed for its dramatic ocean views, was prompted by an increase in fire and wind activity in the Big Sur area, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said. The road was expected to be closed to...

08/08/2016
Colorado anti-fracking initiatives hit signature target
Reuters: Environmental groups in Colorado on Monday said they collected enough signatures to add proposed anti-fracking initiatives to a state ballot in November, as long as their petitions make it through a validation review by the Secretary of State's office. One of the initiatives would strengthen the state's "setback" rules, requiring new oil and gas development facilities to be located at least 2,500 feet from occupied structures and areas of interest, such as parks. The second would transfer regulatory...

08/08/2016
China warns UK relations are at 'historical juncture' over Hinkley Point
Guardian: China has said that its relations with the UK are at a “crucial historical juncture” amid doubts over the future of the controversial Hinkley Point C nuclear power station. The intervention by the Chinese ambassador to the United Kingdom comes after the British government’s decision last month to delay final approval of the project, which is receiving major financial support from China. “If Britain’s openness is a condition for bilateral co-operation, then mutual trust is the very foundation...

08/08/2016
Climate Change May Bring More Tainted Shellfish to Northern Seas
HealthDay: Warming oceans may be boosting levels of dangerous bacteria in northern seas, possibly explaining why more people are getting sickened by tainted seafood and seawater, new research suggests. "From long-term data, it is apparent that the level of these pathogens is rising in the ocean as a result of global warming," said study author Luigi Vezzulli. He is an associate professor with the department of earth, environmental and life sciences at the University of Genoa, in Italy. At the moment, the...

08/08/2016
San Diegans Tell KFC: Drop Chicken Raised on Routine Antibiotics
San Diego Free Press: On Tuesday, August 8th CALPIRG staff and volunteers will deliver petition signatures from thousands of San Diegans to a local KFC urging the fried chicken giant to stop serving meat raised with the routine use of antibiotics. Speakers will talk about the dangers of antibiotic resistance and how KFC can help stop it. Antibiotic resistance is quickly becoming public enemy number one among health experts worldwide. This is especially true with the recent emergence of a new “superbug” resistant to a...

08/08/2016
Blame It on Cronyism, Not the Free Market
Daily Star: The current condition of global economic inequality should be of concern to all. An Oxfam report published this year titled, An economy for the 1%, revealed that "the richest 1% now have more wealth than the rest of the world combined." It also said that "62 of the richest people now own more wealth than the bottom half of the world`s population. In 2015 it was the 80 richest, in 2014 it was 85 and in 2010, only six years back, it was 388 richest that owned similar wealth", showing that inequality...

08/08/2016
Lake Tanganyika fisheries declining from global warming
PhysOrg: The decrease in fishery productivity in Lake Tanganyika since the 1950s is a consequence of global warming rather than just overfishing, according to a new report from an international team led by a University of Arizona geoscientist. The lake was becoming warmer at the same time in the 1800s the abundance of fish began declining, the team found. The lake's algae - fish food - also started decreasing at that time. However, large-scale commercial fishing did not begin on Lake Tanganyika until...

08/08/2016
Millions of FSC-certified Products To Be used In Rio At The 2016 Olympics and Paralympics
Blue and Green: A guide to where you’ll find responsibly-sourced FSC forest products at the Rio Summer Olympics and Paralympic Games Attending Rio 2016 this summer? If so, you’ll almost certainly come into contact with more than one FSC-certified product and, by extension, will be supporting the growth of responsible forestry worldwide. In preparation for the Rio Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) has released a comprehensive list detailing all of the places where responsibly...

08/08/2016
Should you be concerned about plastic and other human debris in your seafood?
Mongabay: By now, you’ve probably heard of the massive, floating garbage patches swirling around in each of Earth’s five major ocean basins: the North and South Atlantic, the North and South Pacific, and the Indian Ocean. Recent research has shown that mankind’s trash does not get trapped in these oceanic gyres forever, as was previously thought, but that currents flowing away from the gyres in the Pacific Ocean allow the debris to eventually wash up on the shores of North and South America. Scientists are...

08/08/2016
2016 Third Warmest for U.S. Through July
Climate Central: In the midst of the dog days of summer, the U.S. is still having its third-hottest year on record through July. The month also saw two states — New Mexico and Florida — clinch their hottest July, while Alaska continued to stay on track for its warmest year in the books. For the contiguous U.S., the year-to-date temperature was 54.3°F (12.4°C), or 3.0°F (1.7°C) above the 20th century average, according to data released Monday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Every state was...

08/08/2016
Accounting for ozone: Study first to quantify impact of oil and gas emissions on Denver's ozone problem
ScienceDaily: The first peer-reviewed study to directly quantify how emissions from oil and gas activities influence summertime ozone pollution in the Colorado Front Range confirms that chemical vapors from oil and gas activities are a significant contributor to the region's chronic ozone problem. Summertime ozone pollution levels in the northern Front Range periodically spike above 70 parts per billion (ppb), which is considered unhealthy -- on average, 17 ppb of that ozone is produced locally. The new research,...

08/08/2016
Pesticides used to help bees may actually harm them
ScienceDaily: Pesticides beekeepers are using to improve honeybee health may actually be harming the bees by damaging the bacteria communities in their guts, according to a team led by a Virginia Tech scientist. The discovery, published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology, is a concern because alterations can affect the gut's ability to metabolize sugars and peptides, processes that are vital for honeybee health. Beekeepers typically apply pesticides to hives to rid them of harmful parasites such as Varroa...

08/08/2016
Vatican newspaper op-ed: address climate change now before it is too late
Catholic Culture: In a front-page column in the August 7 edition of the Vatican newspaper, Italian philosopher Luca Possati said that climate change must be addressed now before it is too late. Citing a report released on August 2 by the National Centers for Environmental Information, Possati noted that the year 2015 was the warmest since climate recordkeeping began in the nineteenth century. Recalling that the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change contains no sanctions, Possati called for a “new globalized approach...

08/08/2016
Suspected illegal herbicide use takes toll on southeast Missouri farmers
Columbia Tribune: Farmers of soybeans and other crops in southeast Missouri, western Tennessee and northeastern Arkansas are facing widespread crop damage believed to be the result of illegal spraying of dicamba, an older herbicide that is finding new life as a tool to battle glyphosate-resistant weeds. In four Missouri Bootheel counties alone, more than 100 complaints of pesticide drift have been reported since June 22, said a representative from the Missouri Department of Agriculture. For comparison, the department...

08/08/2016
Australia: Labor slams Turnbull government 'flip-flopping' on CSIRO climate research
Sydney Morning Herald: Greg Hunt has revealed a plan to focus on climate science with millions more in investment that will create new jobs. The cuts had prompted widespread condemnation, and fears that Australia was undermining global efforts to monitor and predict climate change. The new strategy, which is yet to be fully devised, includes 15 new climate science jobs and research investment worth $37 million over 10 years. The government has increased CSIRO's agency-wide budget from $1.35 billion this financial...

08/08/2016
Solar System: Can Tesla go from sexy car company to clean energy empire?
LA Times: If you're wondering about Elon Musk's latest vision for Tesla, think Apple. Apple succeeded in turning a bland market for electronic devices into a coveted and connected lifestyle where your phone, your tablet, your computer, your watch and your television can all be bought in one place and work seamlessly together. It`s about passion too. People continue to line up at Apple stores overnight to be the first to possess the latest iPhone. The company`s launch events resemble the gathering of...

08/08/2016
Warming climate expected to squeeze out Arctic bird habitat
Anchorage Daily News: Many species of shorebirds that migrate to the Arctic each year to breed their young will lose substantial amounts of their summer habitat to climate change, and the biggest losses in the coming decades will be in Alaska and neighboring parts of Russia, new research concludes. By 2070, higher temperatures brought on by climate change will eliminate important Arctic breeding habitat for at least two-thirds of the 24 bird species evaluated in a study published in the journal Global Change Biology,...

08/08/2016
United Kingdom: Soil Association campaigns against glyphosate in our bread
Ecologist: Wheat harvest will start in the next few weeks, and we are asking bread companies to act now and put a stop to glyphosate as a pre-harvest desiccant in their supply chains A letter calling on leading bread producers and supermarkets to cease stocking and supplying products which contain traces of the herbicide Glyphosate has been sent out by the Soil Association. Glyphosate, more commonly known by its trade name Monsanto's Roundup, was found in March 2015 by the International Agency for Research...

08/08/2016
The Historic Reversal of Populations
Inter Press Service: It first happened in Italy in 1995. Five years later it happened in six additional countries, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Japan, Portugal and Spain. Today the total number of countries where it has occurred stands at 30, including most members of the European Union. In fifteen years that number is expected to nearly double and include Australia, Canada, China, Russia, South Korea and the United States (Table 1). What happened to those countries -- and will continue to occur to virtually every country's...

08/08/2016
Collecting cans to survive: a 'dark future' as California recycling centers vanish
Guardian: Mr Wong was fourth in line to pay his bus fare when the driver spotted the black garbage bag he was carrying. “Off! Off!” the driver shouted. “Nobody wants to smell your cans.” The middle-aged man, who did not want to give his first name, complied. He stepped back onto the sidewalk near San Francisco’s Civic Center. When the next bus arrived, he sneaked on through the rear door. The streets in California may not be paved with gold, but the trash cans that line them are full of money....

08/08/2016
Rejection of experts spreads from Brexit to climate change with 'Clexit'
Guardian: Brexit support and climate denial have many similarities. Many Brexit Leave campaign leaders also deny the dangers of human-caused climate change. Older generations were more likely to vote for the UK to leave the EU and are more likely to oppose taking action on climate change; younger generations disagree, and will be forced to live with the consequences of those decisions. On both issues there’s also a dangerous strain of anti-intellectualism, in which campaigners mock experts and dismiss their...

08/08/2016
Climate change has made a mammal extinct, great job humanity
Metro: For the first time ever, human-driven climate change has caused the extinction of a mammal. The Bramble Cay melomys, a rodent, lived only in the Great Barrier Reef but has been wiped out by rising sea levels, according to Australian researchers. Delta Air Lines grounds ALL flights after massive system outage The long-tailed, whiskered creature lived only on Bramble Cay, a tiny island between Australia and Papua New Guinea, and was thought to be the only mammal native to the Great Barrier...

08/08/2016
Aviation could consume a quarter of 1.5C carbon budget by 2050
Carbon Brief: The aviation industry faces huge challenges if it is to meet its own self-imposed climate change targets, according to a new UN report. And even if it does meet all its targets, aviation will still have consumed 12% of the global carbon budget for 1.5C by 2050, Carbon Brief analysis shows. If it fails to reach this target, its share of this budget could rise to as much as 27%. The sector has an aspirational goal to cap its emissions at 2020 levels, so that any growth after this year is achieved...

08/08/2016
Palm oil giant IOI Group regains RSPO sustainability certification
Guardian: Palm oil supplier IOI Group has had its certificate for sustainable palm oil reinstated by the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), after it was judged to have fulfilled the body’s demands to improve its environmental performance. In a statement issued last Friday, the RSPO said the palm oil supplier would be re-instated with its certificate from Monday. The Malaysia-based conglomerate saw its certification suspended in March this year after the RSPO ruled it was not meeting the certificate’s...

08/08/2016
Carbon Markets See Positive Signal In New US Climate Guidance, But No Game Change
Ecosystem Marketplace: Earlier this week, the US Executive Office issued final guidance instructing all federal agencies to fully consider global warming and its impacts when making decisions and implementing activities. The guidance’s clear mention of land-based mitigation measures leads some practitioners to see market opportunity. Every federal agency of the US government must soon begin quantifying the impact of its activities – both direct and indirect – on the climate under new guidance that the administration...

08/08/2016
Indigenous Communities Risk Lives in Struggle for Self-determination in Education
Inter Press Service: Indigenous peoples around the world continue to struggle for self-determination over their education, as highlighted by recent protests against proposed education reforms in Oaxaca, Mexico, which have left several indigenous teachers dead. “For indigenous peoples, these educational reforms impose hostile cultural practices that put individuality at the centre – not cooperation, not teamwork, they do not put the common good over personal achievement,” René González Pizarro, a teacher and member...

08/08/2016
Save the earth's largest mammals
Deutsche Welle: Gorillas, rhinos, big cats - many iconic species could be wiped out before the end of 2100, say scientists. They are calling on the international community to do more to save the world's largest land mammals. They're known as the big five: Africa's elephants, lions, rhinos, leopards and buffalos. Once the prize-animals hunters would aim to bag while in Africa, now they are THE animals everyone must see on safari when visiting the continent. But it's getting harder to get a glimpse of big mammals,...

08/08/2016
New Zealand farm company to stop using palm oil products
Associated Press: New Zealand's state-owned farming company said Monday it will stop using palm kernel products to feed its animals as it seeks to take better care of the environment. Landcorp announced it will stop using the products by the middle of next year. Environmentalists have linked growth in the palm oil industry to rainforest destruction in Indonesia, which in turn is contributing to the decline in species like the Sumatran tiger. Landcorp Chief Executive Steven Carden told The Associated Press that consumers...


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There is only 0.5 percentage of available fresh water on earth.

 

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