News

EBR Decision
Dr. Tom Puk, a Professor from Lakehead University in Thunder Bay was the person who made the application which resulted in the land-mark 2005 decision to have the Ministry of Education subject to the Environmental Bill of Rights (EBR). This decision is important because it requires the Minister of Education to establish and make public a Statement of Environmental Values (SEV). In addition it means that the public can voice any concerns they have about the SEV via a public forum on the internet. Until this time the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Finance were two of the major Ministries that were not accountable to the EBR (there are still eleven Ministries not subject to the EBR). Acts, regulations or instruments that Ministries put forward that might affect environment must be posted on the Registry before these laws are legislated. Like most of the other Ministries, under the current ruling the Ministry of Education is still not subject to the review process. Unfortunately the Ontario Government has never followed-up on their commitment and the decision to prescribe the Ministry of Education to the EBR has never been acted upon. We would ask that people write in and demand that the Ministry of Education be subject to Notice and Comment and Review ASAP. Even better, citizens should contact their MPP's, the Premier, Minister of Environment, and Minister of Education now. For additional information on how the EBR can impact Ecological Education please contact us at inquiries@ecologicaleducation.ca.



The following Earth News items provided by:

EcoEarth.Info - The Environmental Sustainability Portal

11/22/2014
Mali records new #Ebola case, linked to dead nurse
Reuters: Mali has recorded a new case of Ebola in the capital Bamako after the friend of a nurse who died of the hemorrhagic fever earlier this month tested positive for the disease, health and medical officials said on Saturday. The nurse contracted the disease after treating an imam from neighboring Guinea, who died after being incorrectly diagnosed with kidney problems. This allowed Ebola to spread to five other people in the West African nation's second outbreak. "Of two suspected cases tested,...

11/22/2014
United Nations warns #Ebola still far from over
Associated Press: The head of the UN Ebola mission warned on Friday that the world was "far, far away" from beating the deadly outbreak and said a huge increase in aid was needed to fight the virus in Africa. "There is a long battle ahead of us," Anthony Banbury told the UN security council, which met two months after it declared the outbreak a threat to world security. Fighting the epidemic "is going to require a tremendous increase in resources on the ground, in a dispersed geographic area," said Banbury,...

11/22/2014
Fund the emergency response for #Ebola
Hill: Although the uproar over Ebola in the American news media seems to have been replaced by discussion over midterm elections, sensational magazine covers, and concerns over foreign policy, there is still much work to be done to prevent the effects of an unchecked epidemic from reaching American shores. This has nothing to do with imposing travel restrictions on visitors to the United States or mandatory quarantines on inbound healthcare professionals. Instead, it has to do with the willingness of Congress...

11/22/2014
Climate Change, Evolution: Here's Why We Disagree
ABC News: A growing body of evidence suggests that the passionate debate over public issues ranging from climate change to evolution has little to do with the facts. It has more to do with who we are, which tribe we belong to, and what we hope the future holds. New research from Duke University, for example, concludes that the science of climate change isn't the real issue in that debate. The proposed solutions to that problem -- including bigger government and more regulations -- lead many to conclude...

11/22/2014
A Malaysian snail goes extinct – with 22,000+ other species on the brink
Star: Fishing, logging, mining, agriculture and other activities to satisfy our growing appetite for resources are pushing wild species towards extinction. A species of Malaysian microsnail has been declared “extinct” in the latest Red List of Threatened Species released by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Plectostoma sciaphilum, known only from a single limestone hill in Pahang, has disappeared as the outcrop which it inhabited, Bukit Panching near Kuantan, was quarried...

11/22/2014
Climate change investment falls for second year in 2013
Reuters: Global investment in tackling climate change fell for a second year in 2013 to $331 billion, largely due to a drop in the cost of solar power technology, according to an annual report on climate finance. Overall, the world is falling further and further behind its low-carbon investment goals, warned the Climate Policy Initiative (CPI), a research and advisory group. "Our analysis shows that global investment in a cleaner, more resilient economy is decreasing, and the gap between finance needed...

11/22/2014
Starfish illness harms other sea creatures
National Public Radio: Starfish in the Pacific northwest are being decimated by what's called wasting disease. Researcher Drew Harvell tells NPR's Scott Simon that warming seas are making it worse.

11/22/2014
What's behind snowmageddon that hit the US this week?
New Scientist: Winter has come early to the US this year, with temperatures plunging below freezing across much of the continental US this week. Intense snowstorms dumped almost 2 metres of snow in a few places such as Buffalo in New York state (above), trapping people in cars and buses. So what has caused this unseasonal weather? Cold air is usually trapped in the Arctic by the winds that circle the pole - the polar vortex. The strongest winds found high up in the atmosphere are called the polar jet stream....

11/22/2014
Climate fund receives $9.3bn pledge
BBC: Thirty nations meeting in Berlin have pledged $9.3bn (£6bn) for a fund to help developing countries cut emissions and prepare for climate change. The Green Climate Fund was to have held at least $10bn by the end of 2014, so the pledge is just shy of the target. The South Korea-based fund aims to help nations invest in clean energy and green technology. It is also designed to help them build up defences against rising seas and worsening storms, floods and droughts. Rich nations previously...

11/22/2014
New maps show Bering Sea holds world's most acidic ocean waters
Anchorage Dispatch: The world’s most acidic ocean waters are found in the winter in the Bering Sea, according to studies by scientists at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory who have released a series of maps tracking changes in global marine acidity. With its broad continental shelf, shallow waters, ocean currents that deposit nutrients from around the world, and profusion of tiny plankton that form the base of the food web for marine life, the Bering Sea is home to “wonderful fisheries” as well...

11/22/2014
Tracking ancient greenhouse gas pulses shows climate trouble ahead
Summit Voice: There`s yet more evidence that melting Arctic permafrost will amplify global warming by releasing huge amounts of heat-trapping greenhouse gases. In the latest study, Scientists with the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research tracked a pulse of CO2 and other greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere about 14,600 years ago. The results suggest the gases were released during the start of marked warming phase and originated in thawing Arctic permafrost soil,...

11/22/2014
The future of the planet and the irresponsibility of governments
Inter Press Service: Less than a week after everybody celebrated the historical agreement on Nov. 17 between the United States and China on reduction of CO2 emissions, a very cold shower has come from India. Indian Power Minister Piyush Goyal has declared: "India's development imperatives cannot be sacrificed at the altar of potential climate change many years in the future. The West will have to recognise we have the needs of the poor". This is also a blow to the Asia policy of U.S. President Barack Obama, who...

11/22/2014
US can slash fossil fuel emissions by 85 percent by 2050, new study shows
International Business Times: In America’s low-carbon future, most cars will run on electricity, carbon dioxide will be stored underground, and homes and buildings will be hyper-efficient, guzzling less energy even as the population grows. This is the vision of a new analysis that maps how the United States can drastically curb its greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The plan, unveiled this week, is part of the United Nations' Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project, which aims to figure out how each country should act to limit...

11/22/2014
#Ebola Epidemic Not Even Close to Over, UN Officials Say
NBC: There may be signs of hope in Liberia, but the epidemic of Ebola in West Africa is getting worse, not better, and it’s going to take a lot more work to control it, United Nations officials said Friday. Concerted efforts might be able to end it by the middle of next year, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon told reporters. “There has been some welcome progress,” Ban said. “The results are uneven. The rate of transmission continues to worsen.” Three top international leaders — Ban, World Health...

11/22/2014
Half of Americans Think Climate Change Is a Sign of the Apocalypse
Atlanta: Snowmageddon, snowpocalypse, snowzilla, just snow. Superstorm Sandy, receding shorelines, and more. Hurricanes Isaac, Ivan, and Irene, with cousins Rammasun, Bopha, and Haiyan. The parade of geological changes and extreme weather events around the world since 2011 has been stunning. Perhaps that's part of why, as the Public Religion Research Institute reported on Friday, "The number of Americans who believe that natural disasters are evidence of the apocalypse has increased somewhat over the...

11/22/2014
#Ebola death toll rises to 5459; Cuban doctor 'stable'
Reuters: The death toll in the Ebola epidemic has risen to 5,459 out of 15,351 cases identified in eight countries by the end of Nov. 18, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. The figures showed an increase of 39 recorded deaths and 106 new cases since those issued on Wednesday. "Transmission remains intense in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone," the WHO said, referring to the three hardest-hit West African countries that account for all but 15 of the deaths. All six known Ebola cases in Mali...

11/22/2014
WHO says #Ebola outbreak 'stable' in Guinea
BBC: In Guinea, the World Health Organization has told the BBC the outbreak is now, overall "stable" across the country, despite flare-ups in the south-east. Dr Guenael Rodier said "lessons have been learned" over how the WHO dealt with the outbreak in the first few months. The UN agency has been accused of being too slow to react. Tulip Mazumdar reports.

11/22/2014
Fauci: Stolen Blood Samples in Guinea Least of #Ebola Worries
US News and World Report: A top U.S. official for containing infectious diseases says he is not concerned by reports that bandits – perhaps unwittingly – hijacked a taxi in Guinea carrying blood samples of Ebola victims, saying the report is dwarfed by the ongoing crisis that continues to kill an unprecedented number of people in West Africa. The Associated Press reported the bizarre story Friday, saying unidentified robbers stopped a taxi van on its 165-mile journey from central Kankan prefecture in Guinea to a medical...

11/21/2014
#Ebola outbreak can be ended in 2015: UN's Ban Ki-moon
BBC: The deadly Ebola outbreak can be ended "by the middle of next year" if the world speeds up its response, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has said. But he warned that although the rate of new cases was slowing in parts of West Africa, Mali - where six people have died - was now of deep concern. And the head of the UN Ebola mission, Anthony Banbury, said the world was "far away" from beating the virus. Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia have been worst hit by the Ebola outbreak. Dr Rodier,...

11/21/2014
In Sierra Leone, A Dearth Of Ebola Treatment Centers
WBUR: As Ebola declines in Liberia, it’s on the rise in Sierra Leone. The outbreak has moved from the rural area, where it started, to the capital of Freetown. Schools have been closed for months, and there is now a nighttime curfew. NPR’s global health and development correspondent Nurith Aizenman tells Here & Now`s Robin Young about the roots the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, including the fact that there simply aren’t enough treatment centers to deal with the exponential spread of the virus.

11/21/2014
A big reason climate change isn't a priority: The apocalypse
Washington Post: If you want to understand how little urgency there is among the American public about climate change, consider this: A new survey from the Public Religion Research Institute asked people about the severity of recent natural disasters. About six in 10 (62 percent) said climate change is at least partly to blame. About half -- 49 percent -- cited the biblical end times (as in, the apocalypse) for the recent natural disasters. That latter number is up five points from 2011. (People were allowed...

11/21/2014
US says global October temperatures a record high for month
Australian Broadcasting Corporation: Global temperatures in October, as well as the entire year-to-date, were the planet's hottest on average since record-keeping began in 1880, the US government says. It was also the 38th consecutive October in which global average temperatures were higher than the average for the 20th century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported. "The January-October combined global land and ocean average surface temperature was the warmest such period on record, surpassing the...

11/21/2014
Half Yemen's children malnourished as hunger worsens strife
Reuters: Nearly half the children in Yemen are suffering from malnutrition, the agriculture minister has said, as insurgencies, water scarcity and climate change exacerbate sectarian strife in the Arabian Peninsula's poorest state. "More than half the population of Yemen suffers from food insecurity... 48 percent of the children suffer from malnutrition," Agriculture Minister Farid Mujawar told a U.N. conference in Rome on Wednesday. "We know this challenge of hunger has a major impact on health and...

11/21/2014
Greenhouse gases: More emphasis needed on ozone, methane impact, scientists say
Australian Broadcasting Corporation: There is too much emphasis on carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas and other forms such as ozone, methane and sulphur dioxide should receive more attention, a group of scientists say. Writing a comment piece in the science journal Nature, the group argued that other forms of air pollutants contributed to one in eight deaths worldwide, and nearly 50 million deaths could be avoided by 2040 if emissions were cut in half. Other types of pollutants, such as methane, had a higher global warming potential...

11/21/2014
United Kingdom: Political consensus on climate change has frayed, says Ed Miliband
Guardian: “The political consensus on climate change has frayed,” said Labour party leader Ed Miliband on Thursday evening, who as energy and climate change secretary guided the Climate Change Act through parliament virtually unopposed. “When times got tough, some people headed for the hills.” It’s not a great leap to infer that Miliband was referring to David Cameron, who has gone from hugging huskies in opposition to ditching “green crap” in office. As Miliband is the only alternative PM voters could...

11/21/2014
Can life emerge on a planet without water? New theory says yes
Mother Nature Network: Researchers searching for life on other planets have always believed that there is at least one necessary requirement for life to exist: There must be water. But a new theory by astrobiologists Nediljko Budisa and Dirk Schulze-Makuch suggests that there are alternatives to water that could make life possible even on desert worlds, reports io9.com. It's an exciting idea. If the theory is correct, then the number of planets believed capable of supporting life would increase dramatically. The reason...

11/21/2014
Kenya's iconic Nairobi national park is under threat, conservationists warn
Guardian: It is an image famous in a thousand postcards: giraffe, rhino and zebra pacing the savannah with city skyscrapers towering in the background. But flanked by one of the continent’s fastest growing cities, Kenya’s capital Nairobi, east Africa’s oldest national park is under threat. “There is huge pressure on the park,” said conservation activist Paula Kahumbu, who heads the Wildlife Direct campaign group. Set up by British colonial settlers in the 1940s, pressure now comes from all sides:...

11/21/2014
We need a new law to protect our wildlife from critical decline
Guardian: One of the fears of those who seek to defend the natural world is that people won’t act until it is too late. Only when disasters strike will we understand how much damage we have done, and what the consequences might be. I have some bad news: it’s worse than that. For his fascinating and transformative book, Don’t Even Think About It: why our brains are wired to ignore climate change, George Marshall visited Bastrop in Texas, which had suffered from a record drought followed by a record wildfire,...

11/21/2014
Canada pledges $265m to Green Climate Fund
Guardian: The Canadian government has revealed it will give $265m to a UN fund aimed at helping the world’s poorest countries invest in clean energy technologies and cope with the effects of climate change. The announcement came late on Thursday after a Berlin conference where nearly $9.3 billion was pledged to the Green Climate Fund by 21 countries. Rated the world’s 11th largest economy by the World Bank in 2013, the offer is significantly lower than other major developed countries, but will be seen as...

11/21/2014
Why Cold Weather Doesn't Mean Global Warming Isn't Real
Business Insider: The past couple weeks have given climate change skeptics plenty of events that seem like reasons to dispute global warming. An inundation of wintry weather across the country carried snowstorms and freezing temperatures everywhere from the Pacific Northwest to the Southeast. Most recently, snowstorms in Buffalo, NY have made travel impossible, caused roofs to buckle, and left at least a dozen people dead. If it's so cold and there's a dangerous amount of snow, then how could the Earth possibly...

11/21/2014
Global Temperatures Are the Hottest on Record for a Fifth Month This Year
Time: The world is heading for the warmest year on record with October the fifth month to break worldwide heat records. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced Thursday that the average global temperature for October was 58.43ºF (14.74ºC). "It is becoming pretty clear that 2014 will end up as the warmest year on record," said Deke Arndt, chief of climate monitoring for NOAA`s National Climatic Data Center. "The remaining question is: How much?" This year,...

11/21/2014
Harvard sued over push for fossil fuels divestment
Associated Press: Seven Harvard University students have filed a lawsuit asking a judge to force the university's governing body to divest from fossil fuel companies. The lawsuit filed Wednesday alleges investment in those companies violates the university's duties as a public charity. The complaint asks the court to compel the Harvard Corporation, the governing body, to stop investing any of its $36.4 billion endowment in gas, coal and oil companies. Harvard students have pressed the university to divest from...

11/21/2014
Australia: It took only two days for Abbott's 'conversion' to climate change to be exposed
Bribane Times: Prime Minister Tony Abbott's apparent, if modest, conversion to the idea that climate change was an "important subject" following talks with French president Francois Hollande on Wednesday was greeted with no small measure of cynicism. This was, after all, a politician who had built a political career on climate scepticism, with his famous remark in 2010 that it was "absolute crap" to assert the science was settled. It took only two days, but the doubters can claim vindication after revelations...

11/21/2014
Only 38% Australia's #Ebola funds have made it to Africa, group claims
Guardian: Only 38% of the funds pledged by Australia to fight the Ebola crisis have been distributed to stricken west African countries, an international advocacy organisation has claimed. Campaigning group One, which boasts over six million members worldwide, has created an online Ebola tracker tool which shows how much funding, equipment and health personnel have been pledged by donor countries and large foundations. Australia has committed a total of $42m to tackle the disease, $20m of which will...

11/21/2014
Probing #Ebola's deadly inflammatory effect
LA Times: New research suggests that the massive and destructive inflammation that characterizes Ebola virus disease may be caused by the release of foreign proteins from infected cells. Although Ebola is infamous for causing bleeding in some of its victims, doctors say the vast majority of deaths are the result of organ failure and shock brought on by the uncontrolled release of cytokines, compounds that cells use to communicate with one another and control immune response. It remains somewhat of a...

11/21/2014
Julie Bishop says Barack Obama wrong about climate change threat to Great Barrier Reef
Age: Julie Bishop has rejected Barack Obama's assertion that the Great Barrier Reef is under threat from climate change in a further sign of the Australian government's displeasure with the US President's speech that overshadowed the G20 in Brisbane. But world leading scientists have rejected Ms Bishop's claims, pointing out that rising temperatures threaten the reef with mass bleaching, while fragile ecosystems will suffer due to increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide in the oceans. The Foreign...

11/21/2014
EU Court Rules British Government Must Limit Diesel Exhaust
Environment News Service: The United Kingdom must clean up illegal levels of air pollution "as soon as possible," the European Court of Justice ruled Wednesday, in its first decision on the European Union`s 2008 air quality law. The case was originally brought in the British courts by ClientEarth, a London-based environmental group concerned about the 29,000 people who die early in the UK each year as a result of air pollution. ClientEarth asked the British courts to require the UK Government to revise its plans to...

11/21/2014
Residents in western New York call snow worst in memory
Reuters: The death toll from the worst snow in memory in western New York has risen to at least 10. Some areas of New York state along the Great Lakes had around 2 feet (60 cm) of new snow on Thursday on top of accumulations as deep as 5 feet from earlier in the week. The National Weather Service said parts of the region could expect 3 feet more snow before skies clear on Friday. At least 10 deaths in the area have been blamed on the storm, Erie County officials said. "I've been in a lot of snowstorms,...

11/21/2014
5 Hot Months, 1 Warm Year And All The Arguments To Follow
ABC: The country's attention shifted this week to crippling snowstorms in the northeast burying entire cities under several feet of snow, so let's talk about how ungodly warm it's been this year. No, really. Despite the eastern United States being one of the colder zones on the planet this year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration just became the latest organization to pronounce 2014 likely the hottest on record. (Video via WGRZ) The NOAA released a dizzying set of statistics Thursday...

11/21/2014
India must address issue of nanoparticles: French scientist
Daiji World: A French scientist Friday cautioned India that it needs to pay attention to the disposal of lab-synthesised nanoparticles -- an important area of research -- as they might pose environmental and health hazards. "There are a lot of centres in India trying to create nanoparticles but the Indian government must address the fate of those particles, particularly in the context of human health," said Marc Benedetti, professor of the department of chemistry at the University Denis-Diderot (IPGP) in France....

11/21/2014
A CDC Epidemiologist Talks About Life on the Front Lines of the War Against #Ebola
Time: THE ROLE OF CDC DOCTORS DEPLOYED TO FIGHT EBOLA IS NOT PATIENT CARE. WHY? I am a medical epidemiologist, and epidemiologists control disease at a population level. I volunteered to go to Sierra Leone with CDC to help control the outbreak and support local efforts to slow it down. WASN`T IT DIFFICULT FOR YOU NOT TO TREAT PATIENTS? I was treating patients, but not one at a time. That's public health. I was supporting the system of outbreak control so that there will ultimately be fewer patients...

11/20/2014
India needs to improve energy efficiency by 2030: UN report
Economic Times: Nearly one lakh premature deaths take place annually due to air pollution in India and some other countries which can be avoided by 2030 by improving energy efficiency measures in transport and industrial sectors, a UN report today said. The fifth Emissions Gap Report 2014 by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), which was released today, said that countries across the globe need to "shrink" greenhouse gas emissions to net zero between 2080 and 2100 in order to limit global temperature...

11/20/2014
These terrible governors won reelection and will keep wreaking environmental havoc
Grist: Among the many bits of bad news for the environment from this year’s midterm elections, one that got lost in all the drama around control of the Senate is that a trio of far-right governors of swing states managed to win reelection: Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, Florida’s Rick Scott, and Maine’s Paul LePage. They were elected in the 2010 Republican wave, with support from the Tea Party movement, despite being way to the right of their states` electorates. They looked vulnerable this year but they held...

11/20/2014
Cold snap caused by climate change-weakened jet stream, scientists suggest
Al Jazeera: Arctic conditions in eastern United States this week may have been the result of climate change-induced stressors on the jet stream that regulates weather over the northern hemisphere, according to meteorologists. Residents in a large swath of the country's east have been met with sub-freezing temperatures over the past week. And overnight Wednesday, more than 5 feet of snow descended on parts of western New York state. Media have referred to the strange weather pattern as the Polar Vortex and...

11/20/2014
Real-Time Ocean Acidification Data Now Available for U.S. Pacific Coast
Yale Environment 360: Researchers, coastal managers, and shellfish farmers along the U.S. Pacific coast can now get real-time ocean acidification data through an online tool developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The data — which includes measurements of pH, carbon dioxide concentrations, salinity, and water temperatures at various sites — should help organizations and businesses make decisions about managing coastal resources and craft adaptation strategies, NOAA researchers say. The...

11/20/2014
Acid Maps Reveal Worst of Climate Change
Scientific American: Much of the change in climate change is happening to the ocean. It`s not just the extra heat hiding within the waves. The seven seas also absorb a big share of the carbon dioxide released by burning the fossilized sunshine known as coal, natural gas and oil. All those billions and billions of CO2 molecules interact with the brine to make it ever so slightly more acidic over time and, as more and more CO2 gets absorbed, the oceans become more acidic. Now scientists have delivered the most comprehensive...

11/20/2014
UN climate fund falls short of $10 billion target
Associated Press: A U.N. fund that will help poor countries tackle climate change has fallen short, for now, of its target of collecting $10 billion, officials said Thursday. About 30 countries meeting in Berlin pledged a total of $9.3 billion toward the Green Climate Fund, according to Germany's development ministry, which co-hosted the conference. Last week, the U.S. pledged $3 billion, the biggest amount so far. Britain announced Thursday it would give 720 million pounds ($1.13 billion). Japan, Germany and...

11/20/2014
Conflict-fueled deforestation, poaching in Assam cont despite truce
Mongabay: Northeastern India boasts nearly 44 percent of the country’s dense forests, and contains one of the most biodiverse areas in the world. However, the region lost approximately 548,440 hectares of tree cover--more than 3 percent--from 2001 through 2012. Sonitpur, Assam, has been particularly hard hit as people flooded into the area and cleared forest. An indigenous group called the Bodos began agitating for a separate state, "Bodoland,"in the 1990s, encouraging an influx into Sonitpur and the surrounding...

11/20/2014
NOAA: Globe sets 5th hottest-month record of 2014
Associated Press: Despite a bitter U.S. cold snap, the globe is rushing hell-bent toward its warmest year on record with last month setting the fifth monthly heat record of the year. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Thursday that last month was the hottest October on record worldwide. The 58.43 degrees Fahrenheit (14.74 Celsius) beat out October 2003. "It is becoming pretty clear that 2014 will end up as the warmest year on record," said Deke Arndt, climate monitoring chief for NOAA's...

11/20/2014
More Than #Ebola, Other Tropical Diseases Pose Growing Threat to US
National Geographic: The United States' latest brush with Ebola shows that, more than ever, diseases are global travelers. A physician died at a Nebraska hospital on Monday after contracting the disease in Sierra Leone, where he was working. A New York physician came down with Ebola last month after working in West Africa, sparking quarantines for returning health workers in some states. Earlier in October, a man died in Dallas after becoming infected in Liberia. But Ebola isn't the tropical disease that's most...

11/20/2014
How #Ebola Impedes Women's Empowerment in West Africa
Huffington Post: On November 17, 2014, at a women's health event called "Better by Half," Barbara Bush and Melinda Gates voiced concerns about women's health in Ebola-affected countries. Arguing that "women's health is becoming a casualty of the Ebola outbreak," Bush and Gates reignited calls to take concerted action to address the Ebola crisis. As I read Lucy Westcott's Newsweek piece "Barbara Bush on the Impact of Ebola on Women's Health," I couldn't agree more with Bush's remark on the conversation about Ebola....

11/20/2014
#Ebola Stokes Liberian Food Shortage as Farmers Eat Seeds
Bloomberg: The Ebola crisis is exacerbating food shortages in Liberia as a lack of labor hinders production and hungry rice farmers eat the seeds they’d normally hold back for planting next season. Ebola will leave a lasting impact of malnutrition even as the number of new cases of the deadly disease is beginning to slow, Charles McClain, a deputy minister at the country’s Agriculture Ministry, said yesterday in an interview at an international conference on nutrition at the United Nations’ Food & Agriculture...

11/20/2014
#Ebola has so far killed 5420 people: WHO
Press TV: The Ebola epidemic has so far claimed the lives of 5,420 people all around the world, while more than 15,145 people have been infected, the World Health Organization (WHO) says. The virus has been most devastating in the West African countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, which have seen the most fatalities with 2,964, 1,250 and 1,192 deaths, respectively, the WHO announced on Wednesday. However, the WHO predicts that the number of Ebola victims is likely to be much higher than the...

11/20/2014
Australia's Chance El Niño Rises To 70%; Heatwaves & Drought To Persist
International Business Times: The weather bureau has revised its El Niño forecast from a 50 percent probability to the current 70 percent. According to the bureau's latest report, above average sea temperatures continue to rise in the Pacific Ocean in the last two weeks. Surface temperatures have increased higher than El Niño thresholds in the past three months. The bureau's El Niño southern oscillation tracker status was changed from "watch" to "alert" level. The eastern part of Australia may be facing dry conditions in the...

11/19/2014
Nasa animation shows stunning year in life of carbon emissions
Guardian: This is what your atmosphere looks like in carbon dioxide (CO2). And it’s not a pretty sight. Nasa provides a stark and stunning view of a year in the life of our planet as humans continue to emit greenhouse gases that warm the planet. The animation comes courtesy of one of the highest-resolution computer models in existence. Since the industrial revolution, CO2 has been rising in the atmosphere due to human activities. Seasonal cycles mean that CO2 rises progressively throughout autumn and winter...

11/19/2014
Idaho hunters target gray wolves in controversial predator derby
Guardian: Coyotes, weasels, skunks, jackrabbits, raccoons and European starlings – early next year, hunters as young as 10 will join a competitive hunt in Salmon, Idaho, for a chance to kill from that wild menu. The competition, called the ‘predator derby’, would be unremarkable if it weren’t for the breadth of targets, including the most controversial prey of all: the gray wolf. Warning that wolves could die like “vermin,” environmentalists have dubbed the event a “killfest”, setting up a showdown with...

11/19/2014
Elephants are being wiped out, but not enough people care
Guardian: I asked a senior environmental journalist the other week what he thought was the single most under-reported environmental issue. He replied, unhesitatingly, wildlife poaching. “It’s as if the wildlife is just being hoovered out of Africa,” he said. “In the 1960s people campaigned around whales and wildlife. The Daily Mail actually put rhino poaching on their front page. But now there just doesn’t seem to be the same level of interest.” Dr Paula Kahumbu, a wildlife campaigner based in Kenya, echoes...

11/19/2014
Conservationists slam plans to dump mining waste into Norwegian fjord
Guardian: Norway’s image as one of the world’s cleanest, greenest countries with some of the finest unspoilt scenery will be tarnished if the government allows a giant titanium mining company to dump hundreds of millions of tonnes of waste directly into a fjord, conservationists warn. Nordic Mining has applied to dump nearly 6m tonnes of tailings a year for 50 years into Førde Fjord, one of the country’s most important spawning grounds for cod and salmon, and a site where whales and porpoises congregate....

11/19/2014
Transforming cities for sustainability: Facts and Figures
SciDevNet: Kate Hawley examines how urban areas are evolving to be sustainable -- their challenges, trends and solutions. Already, 54 per cent of the world's population lives in urban regions, and projections suggest this will keep increasing until at least 2050. [1] The shift from a rural- to an urban-dominant globe signals more strongly than ever the need to transform how cities develop. Architects, engineers, urban planners, civil society and policy makers face the challenges of creating sustainable,...

11/19/2014
India targets 500% increase in solar power generation
RTCC: India is planning a fivefold increase in its solar power target, according to the country’s energy minister. Speaking at an event in New Delhi, Piyush Goyal said that India would boost its current target of 20 gigawatts of solar power generation by 2022 to 100 gigawatts. “On the solar front, we believe there is enormous potential to take it to 100,000W in next 5-7 years," he said. He added that renewables needed to be a “self-sustained industry and not dependent on government subsidies”....

11/19/2014
Australian government to scrutinise new Japanese whaling plan
Guardian: The Australian government has reiterated its opposition to whaling following Japan’s plan to resume hunting in the Antarctic waters next year but has been urged to apply diplomatic pressure to Tokyo over the issue. On Tuesday, the Japanese government revealed a plan to kill 333 minke whales in the Southern Ocean next year. Over the 12-year period of the plan, 3,996 whales will be targeted. The target of 333 whales is significantly lower than previous quotas Japan has awarded itself and follows...

11/19/2014
Study counters case for climate change-violence link
SciDevNet: Climate change is far from being solely to blame for violence in Sub-Saharan Africa, say researchers -- other factors matter much more. Their paper, published on 10 November in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, contradicts earlier studies that found that higher temperatures are a major risk factor in conflict. For instance, last year a different group concluded that a shift towards hotter conditions by a single statistical unit known as a 'standard deviation' -- equivalent...

11/19/2014
United Kingdom: MPs raise concern over tests on pesticides linked to bee deaths
Telegraph: MPs have raised concerns over whether two chemical companies unduly influenced an independent study into the effects of their pesticides on bees. Syngenta of Switzerland and Bayer CropScience of Germany held discussions with the independent Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) overthe test's design, monitoring and data analysis. Both companies were made subject of a European Commission ban last year on neonicotinoid-based products, which are considered harmful to bees. If the ban is extended...

11/19/2014
Why pesticides are so harmful to bees
Telegraph: The European Commission announced an EU-wide ban on the substances in April 2013 which is set to expire next year. Britain agreed to comply with the ruling, but said it didn't agree with the science behind the decision. What is the problem? Concern has focussed on honey bees, whose population has declined by around 25 per cent in recent years. Numerous studies have directly linked bee death to the use of neonicotinoid -- though not everyone is convinced. Critics say too many test are...

11/19/2014
Could Obama cut deal on Keystone pipeline? Don't rule it out
Reuters: President Barack Obama might be open to using the Keystone pipeline as leverage with Republicans if they cooperate on other aspects of his long-stalled domestic agenda, such as investing in infrastructure, closing tax loopholes or reducing carbon emissions. After years of fighting over TransCanada's crude oil pipeline from Canada, a Keystone deal is not entirely out of the question, sources inside the administration and others close to the White House told Reuters on Tuesday. With the Senate's...

11/19/2014
Louisiana Senate Seat Is Real Reward in Keystone Pipeline Vote
New York Times: As Senators began debating the fate of the Keystone XL pipeline ahead of a Tuesday night vote on the project, it became clear that Republicans and Democrats viewed the Louisiana Senate seat, rather than the oil pipeline, as the real prize in the fight. Senator Mary L. Landrieu, Democrat of Louisiana, faces a runoff for re-election Dec. 6 against Representative Bill Cassidy, a Republican. Both have brought up bills aimed at approving the pipeline in hopes of winning new votes in their state, whose...

11/19/2014
Q&A: What Does the Proposed Keystone XL Pipeline Entail?
New York Times: Q. What is the Keystone XL pipeline? A. The Keystone oil pipeline system is designed to carry up to 830,000 barrels of petroleum per day from the oil sands of boreal forests in Alberta, Canada to oil refineries and ports on the Gulf Coast. About half of the system is already built, including a pipeline that runs east from Alberta and down through North Dakota, South Dakota and Nebraska. The State Department is now reviewing a proposed 1,179-mile addition to the pipeline, the Keystone XL, a shortcut...

11/18/2014
Hawaiian Marine Refuge Filled with Ocean Life... and Garbage
Nature World: The Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in Hawaii, one of the largest marine refuges in the world, is filled with a wide array of ocean life, as well as 57 tons of garbage. At least, it was until the NOAA sent a team to the World Heritage Site in October to clean up the trash, which had shockingly accumulated in just a year's time. This stretch of tiny uninhabited islands and coral reefs seems to be the endpoint of the massive amounts of garbage that humans dump into the oceans. A group...

11/18/2014
Why Lizards Have Bird Breath
Nature World: It has long been thought by scientists that birds' one-directional loop through their lungs was a unique characteristic, but a new study shows that lizards too may share this type of breathing. If University of Utah researchers are accurate with their findings, it would mean this unidirectional flow evolved long before the first birds, arising nearly 300 million years ago in a common ancestor of lizards, snakes, crocodiles and dinosaurs including birds. "We thought we understood how these lungs...

11/18/2014
Should U.S. Government Kill Thousands of Birds to Save Salmon?
National Geographic: Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them. It's September, and the low-lying island is relatively quiet. Most of the fledglings and their parents have left, and only a few thousand pelicans and cormorants remain. But in the spring, 60,000...

11/18/2014
40 Years Scratching Reveals Ocean Acidification Data
Climate Central: As carbon dioxide levels increase due largely to human emissions, the world's oceans are becoming highly corrosive to a number of organisms that call it home. But the rate of acidification and related changes are anything but uniform. That's why a new study aims to set a baseline for nearly every patch of saltwater from sea to acidifying sea so that future acidification and its impacts can be better monitored. Taro Takahashi, a geochemist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory who authored the new...

11/18/2014
#Ebola outbreak: Are we failing our medical heroes?
Newsday: Upon returning to the United States from Liberia early last month, physician and anthropologist Paul Farmer described the shallow response in the West to the current Ebola outbreak as a "terrorism of poverty." Since then, Harvard University -- where Farmer works -- and other organizations have imposed tough travel restrictions from the United States to any West African nation displaying evidence of the disease. These new guidelines make it inconvenient, if not virtually impossible, for clinicians...

11/18/2014
Arctic blast in U.S. brings early snow, freezing temperatures
Reuters: Heavy snow and freezing temperatures blasted across the United States on Tuesday, with Northeast towns declaring emergencies and Southern states bracing for record cold. The Arctic chill that swept through the Rocky Mountains last week arrived in the Northeast and would push southward by evening, said National Weather Service meteorologist Patrick Burke. "Pretty much everybody, including the Southeast, will be entrenched in the cold," Burke said. In western New York, a storm brought as much...

11/18/2014
Here’s why the GOP just loves fossil fuels
Grist: Pop the champagne corks in Washington! It’s party time for Big Energy. In the wake of the midterm elections, Republican energy hawks are ascendant, having taken the Senate and House by storm. They are preparing to put pressure on a president already presiding over a largely drill-baby-drill administration to take the last constraints off the development of North American fossil fuel reserves. The new Republican majority is certain to push their agenda on a variety of key issues, including tax...

11/18/2014
Years of marine research sunk – because seals ate the evidence
Independent: When scientists began tagging wild fish to track their movements, the researchers thought they were the only ones listening to the acoustic signals. Unfortunately for the shoals fitted with the devices, experts had not reckoned on the intelligence of hungry seals that learnt to interpret the noise tags as “dinner bells”, beckoning the predators straight to a tasty fish meal. In fact, the quick-learning seals have become so adept at picking up the signals, and realising they meant food was around,...

11/18/2014
Helping children devastated by #Ebola in Sierra Leone
ITV: Since founding Street Child in 2008 I have visited Sierra Leone over 30 times, but this is my most poignant and challenging visit to date. During my trip I am spending three days working alongside our Street Child teams across the country, assisting their work with Ebola orphans and meeting some of our current beneficiaries. This is my first trip to Sierra Leone since the Ebola crisis began and when I arrived Sunday night the stark differences were immediately apparent, everything looks different....

11/18/2014
Man Mauled Polar Bear: Climate Change Linked Increased Attacks
EcoWatch: Matt Dyer was camping with fellow hikers on a Sierra Club outing when, despite taking proper steps to protect themselves, a polar bear came to their camp in the middle of the night and pulled him out of his tent. He suffered two cracked vertebrae, a broken jaw, a collapsed lung and injuries to both of his hands. Democracy Now! interviewed Rich Gross, a Sierra Club guide on the trip, and Sabrina Shankman, a reporter with InsideClimate News and author of the new ebook Meltdown: Terror at the Top...

11/18/2014
Disappearing oasis northeastern India losing forests as people move in
Mongabay: Northeastern India is a distinct entity in many ways. The region is connected to the rest of the country by a narrow strip of Indian land, with a width of just 21 to 40 kilometers (13 to 25 miles). The region has more than 250 indigenous groups that speak a variety of languages. The area is also part of the Eastern Himalaya biodiversity hotspot, one of the megadiverse areas of the world; a meeting ground of temperate east Himalayan flora, the paleo-arctic flora of the Tibetan highlands and wet evergreen...

11/18/2014
Fracking Approved in Largest National Forest in Eastern U.S
EcoWatch: Despite strong opposition from both elected officials in the affected areas and environmental groups, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) has approved fracking in George Washington Forest. Objections to the plan came from members of Congress from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C., Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe and Washington D.C. city council, which passed a resolution opposing it in March. McAuliffe reiterated his opposition before a meeting of the state’s Climate Change and Resilience Commission...

11/18/2014
6 Questions What's Next for Keystone XL as US Senate Votes
National Geographic: A U.S. Senate vote on the Keystone XL pipeline, slated for Tuesday, won't resolve the seemingly endless pipeline saga that has engulfed Barack Obama's presidency. Even if the Senate passes a bill to force approval of the $8 billion U.S.-Canadian pipeline, as the U.S. House of Representatives did for the ninth time last week, that won't end debate and begin the project's construction. Not even close. Congress is unlikely to muster the two-thirds majority to override an expected Obama veto. Even...

11/18/2014
How remote sensing could change conservation forever
Mongabay: Remote sensing has changed the way we see our planet. And it has the power to change how we do conservation work, according to a new paper in Conservation Biology. Written by 32 scientists from organizations as diverse as NASA and the Jane Goodall Institute, the paper highlights ten areas where conservation efforts could benefit from remote sensing data. "Remote sensing data from orbiting satellites have been used to measure, understand, and predict environmental changes since the 1970s, but technology...

11/18/2014
Pipeline builder advised to gin up fake grassroots support
Grist: TransCanada Corp., the company seeking to build the Keystone XL pipeline, has teamed up with the world`s largest public relations firm to promote a proposed alternative pipeline that`s entirely in Canada. Greenpeace Canada obtained documents that the U.S. public relations firm Edelman drafted for TransCanada that outline a campaign to promote Energy East, the company`s proposed 2,858-mile pipeline that would transport crude oil from the Alberta tar sands to the east coast of Canada. The company...

11/18/2014
Keystone XL pipeline opposition forges 'Cowboys and Indians' alliance
Guardian: As she watches the red sun dip past the window of her home deep in a South Dakota valley, Beth Lone Eagle says she isn’t prepared to see a tar sands pipeline tarnish any bit of “God’s country”. With the US Senate scheduled to hold a vote on the Keystone XL pipeline on Tuesday, the Lakota woman says ranchers, landowners and tribal nations throughout the midwest are girding for a fight regardless of how the process in Washington plays out. The debate over the controversial pipeline, which would run...

11/18/2014
Rediscovered in 2010, rare Indian frog surprises by breeding in bamboo
Mongabay: For a long time, this rare white spotted bush frog lived a secretive life: the Critically Endangered Chalazodes bubble-nest frog (Raorchestes chalazodes) was last seen in 1874 and presumed to be extinct. That is until 2010 when a year-long expedition to try and locate ‘lost’ amphibians in India found the elusive frog in the wet evergreen forests of the Western Ghats, after more than 130 years. Now, Seshadri K.S., one of the discoverers, and his colleagues from the National University of Singapore...

11/18/2014
Emerald Ash Borer 'Winning' Along East Coast
Nature World News: Even as winter closes in, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) continues to be a threatening nuisance to states across the East Coast, destroying ash trees and jacking up the price of firewood just before we need it. Now it has spread to new states and Canada, sparking renewed efforts to keep it contained. As of late last week, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) confirmed the concentrated presence of EAB in the Municipality of Notre-Dame-de-Laus, Quebec. Disturbingly, this discovery is well outside...

11/18/2014
India quarantines man recovering from #Ebola
Reuters: India has quarantined a man who was cured of Ebola in Liberia but continued to show traces of the virus in samples of his semen after arriving in the country, the Indian Health Ministry said on Tuesday. The ministry said in a statement that the Indian national had been shown to be negative for Ebola in tests conforming to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, but had been quarantined as a precautionary measure when he arrived at New Delhi airport on Nov. 10. Later, tests of his semen detected...

11/18/2014
The Green Climate Fund is not a charity but an investment in our shared future
Guardian: A world that does not manage to curb global warming is an insecure world. A series of recent reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change makes it abundantly clear. If we do not succeed in staying below the target of keeping temperature rises below 2C over preindustrial levels, the consequences are likely to be far-reaching and disastrous. We will see a dramatic rise in sea levels, by up to a metre in this century alone, a greater frequency of violent storms, increased desertification,...

11/18/2014
9 extraordinary facts about North America's native bees
Mother Nature Network: We all know bees are amazing. Without these pollinators, humans and many other creatures would starve to death. But there is so much about bees that most of us don't realize, including the sheer amount of diversity. There are over 4,000 species of native bees in North America alone. And with such diversity comes extraordinarily cool quirks and behaviors. Photographer Clay Bolt is on a journey to document all of North America's bees, and he has come across some fascinating facts. He has provided...

11/18/2014
Monkey malaria on the rise among humans in Malaysia
SciDevNet: Once only monkeys were suffering -- now people are getting sick too. Monkey malaria, which is three times more severe than other forms of malaria, now accounts for two-thirds of human malaria cases in Malaysian Borneo, says Balbir Singh, director of the Malaria Research Centre at the University of Malaysia in Sarawak. Other South-East Asian countries such as Cambodia and Thailand are seeing infections too. Signs that monkey malaria may now be jumping directly between humans could lead to a further...

11/18/2014
US-China climate deal's ambition fails to impress India
Guardian: The United States and China sprang a surprise last week with their secretly-negotiated deal to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Although cheered as “historic milestone in the global fight against climate change,” “the real deal,” a “landmark,” “ambitious,” and “game-changer” by western media, the agreement received a less than enthusiastic response in India. The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a research and advocacy NGO based in Delhi, called it a “self-serving and business-as-usual”...

11/18/2014
Supporters of Keystone XL pipeline bill likely to fall just short in Senate vote
Guardian: The great-grandson of the oil tycoon John D Rockefeller has appeared to dash hopes of passing legislation backing the Keystone XL energy pipeline, as he became the final waverer to indicate he would vote no in a high-profile Senate showdown on Tuesday evening. The last-minute opposition indicated by Jay Rockefeller, the outgoing senator for West Virginia, leaves backers of the bill one short of the 60 senators it needs to pass, and scrambling to change minds before a vote due at about 6.15pm....

11/18/2014
Governments agree 20% hike in bluefin tuna catch
Guardian: Fishing nations agreed on Monday to a 20% annual increase over three years in quotas of bluefin tuna caught in the Mediterranean and East Atlantic, environmental groups said. But they failed once more to back a ban on shark-finning – a practice fuelled by demand in Asia – or strengthen protection for the Mediterranean swordfish, the sources said. The tuna decision came against the backdrop of an apparent recovery in stocks of the species, called Atlantic bluefin. This year’s quota of 13,500...

11/18/2014
Bangladesh: Farming on Water to Prevent the Effects of Climate Change
New York Times: Each year the brown waters of the Gumani river swell during the summer monsoon, creeping over the surrounding fields to flood Charbhangura, a village of 2,500 people in the Pabna district of northwest Bangladesh. From July to October the waters can rise at least 10 feet. The trunks of trees more than 30 feet away from the dry season riverbed show watermarks waist high. When the fields flood, the village’s farmers have no work. “There is water all around,” said Hafiza Khatun, 25, a mother of...

11/18/2014
Canada: TransCanada Plots Dirty PR Campaign to Push New Pipeline
EcoWatch: Burned by the public opposition to its Keystone XL pipeline, which has held up the project for six years, Alberta tar sands company TransCanada has laid out plans to prevent the same thing from happening as it clears the way to build its even longer and larger capacity cross-continental Energy East pipeline. Greenpeace has leaked documents which reveal the company’s secret strategy, much of which hinges on the same astroturf and dirty tricks tactics used by Rick Berman, whose smear campaign against...

11/18/2014
The Circular Economy of Recycled Paper
New York Times: Three times a week, tanker trucks make an hourlong journey from a baby-food factory in Nunspeet, in the central Netherlands, to a paper mill in the southeastern city of Roermond. The trucks carry 90 cubic meters, or about 24,000 gallons, a week of phosphate produced as a waste byproduct at the baby-food factory, to be fed to bacteria in an anaerobic fermentation tank at the mill. One person’s trash can be another’s treasure. “They had a lot of expenses to get rid of it, and we had expense to get...

11/18/2014
Neil Young Boycotts Starbucks Over Its Opposition to GMO Labeling
EcoWatch: Neil Young has long been known for his involvement in environmental and social justice issues. Now Young has extended his longtime activism to another area: taking on Starbucks and its association with the anti-GMO labeling Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA). The GMA has spent heavily in states where GMO labeling has been on the ballot, working to defeat it, usually coming in just behind Monsanto in the size of its donations. “Goodbye Starbucks!” Young announces on his website. “I used to...

11/18/2014
President Obama's climate leadership faces the Keystone XL challenge
Guardian: What a change a few years makes. For those of us concerned about climate change, seven years ago marked a low-point. It was a time where no meaningful actions had been taken to reduce carbon pollution and prepare our nation and the world for the threat of global warming. Now, we celebrate a series of major plans and actions that have the potential for helping us avoid the worst climate risks. These past years have cemented Obama’s legacy as a climate-aware president. They have also cemented the...

11/18/2014
Fast-warming gulf of Maine hints at future for oceans
Yale Environment 360: After hauling in the cages at his island oyster farm near Biddeford, Maine, Mark Green's boat is loaded with crusty marine life. Baskets of oysters are there, but so are green crabs — invasive and inedible. "My boat will be full," Green says. "The bottom will just be this undulating mass of green crabs by the end of the day. I mean thousands." A native of Europe, green crabs have been present on the U.S. East Coast for more than a century, but until a couple of years ago they didn't cause much trouble...

11/18/2014
#Ebola eats at my soul every day: Stories survival from Sierra Leone
Mashable: Mariatu lives in Port Loko, a once-bustling mining district in northern Sierra Leone where Ebola is currently spreading like a wildfire. The deadly virus has changed everything here. Fear and anxiety are palpable. Movement is restricted and high-risk areas quarantined. Schools are shut, health clinics are paralyzed, businesses have collapsed and the street-side fruit and vegetable stands where most villagers buy food are disappearing. Those who become infected face grim choices, as there is...

11/18/2014
Computer model provides a new portrait of carbon dioxide
ScienceDaily: An ultra-high-resolution NASA computer model has given scientists a stunning new look at how carbon dioxide in the atmosphere travels around the globe. Plumes of carbon dioxide in the simulation swirl and shift as winds disperse the greenhouse gas away from its sources. The simulation also illustrates differences in carbon dioxide levels in the northern and southern hemispheres and distinct swings in global carbon dioxide concentrations as the growth cycle of plants and trees changes with the...


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One in every 5 countries is expected to experience a severe shortage of water within 25 years.

 

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